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Professor Contributes to Italian Compilation

by Office of Marketing | March 30, 2011
When a Catholic press in Rome enlisted the help of some Protestant leaders to write about past influential men and women of the Protestant tradition, Professor Malcolm Brubaker was invited to contribute to the compilation.

When a Catholic press in Rome enlisted the help of some Protestant leaders to writeProfessor Contributes to Italian Compilation about past influential men and women of the Protestant tradition, Professor Malcolm Brubaker was invited to contribute to the compilation. The finished book, Testimoni Della Fede Nelle Chiese Della Riforma, translated: Witnesses of the Faith in the Churches of the Reformation, became an A-Z biographical reference work made up of hundreds of articles about historical "witnesses of the faith." 

Out of a list of many possibilities of people about whom he could research, Brubaker's German Mennonite Church of the Brethren background influenced his decision to write about three historical leaders: Jacob Albright, an 18th century Pennsylvania German Methodist minister, and the namesake of Albright College in Reading, Pennsylvania; Jacob Amman, a 16th century Swiss Mennonite Pennsylvanian whose followers became known as the Amish; and Menno Simons, a Dutch Anabaptist from the 16th century who is considered the father of the Mennonites. Brubaker also chose to write about Johann Albrecht Bengel, a highly respected German Lutheran minister known for his textual criticism of the New Testament and for his influential 18th century Bible commentary. 

Researching these leaders not only gave him insight into Pentecostal history and his own cultural background, but it also helped him to better understand the people around him and the region in which he now teaches at Valley Forge Christian College. 

Having looked forward to the complete published book for several years, Professor Brubaker finally received it. But to his surprise he discovered it had been completely translated into Italian. He can't even read his own articles. Thankfully he has two Italian colleagues with whom he can share the book, both of whom just might be interested in learning more about their history.