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Professor Climbs Mount Kilimanjaro To Raise Money for Wells in Africa

by Office of Marketing | January 01, 2011
Most people would dig down to drill a well. But Valley Forge Christian College Professor Phil Baker is climbing up Mt. Kilimanjaro. On January 3, 2011, Baker, along with his son Josiah and about fifty other influential leaders, will fly to Tanzania, East Africa, to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro, the world's highest free-standing mountain. Each step that they take will raise money for building community wells in African villages; wells that will help reduce the staggering statistic that about 6,000 children die every day because of water borne disease. "It gripped my heart that we could help save lives", Baker said. "I want to raise awareness of that [need]". 

The climb will take a total of six days, and climbers will be assisted by porters who will carry their equipment, and by doctors in case of medical issues. During their stay, the climbers will also get to visit an African village so that they even more fully understand the impact that their gift of a well will have on the local communities. 

Each climber will raise an average of $10,000 toward drilling the wells.WorldServe International, a non-profit community development organization, will receive the funds and will use them to provide clean water to 50 communities in East Africa. Each climber will be told which village received their donation, which will greatly enhance the experience for climbers and supporters. Not only will the money raised save physical lives, but it will open doors to present the gospel to people who may never have heard this message before. 

Baker says that one of the most special parts of this trip is that he gets to share the experience with his fifteen-year-old son, Josiah. The two have been training for the climb by regularly climbing Monocacy Hill, a summit near their home in Pennsylvania. 

Professor Baker will return home on January 14th, knowing that he has made a difference in thousands of lives. To donate funds toward his well project go to Kiliclimb.org. If you'd like to follow the climb and view daily video updates, visit Kiliclimb.org/follow-the-climb.