English Language & Literature

Bachelor of Arts127 Credits

The English Language & Literature major is designed to allow students to study a wide selection of literatures so that they will become discerning readers, effective writers, and critical and creative thinkers. The major will encourage them to integrate their Christian faith with all aspects of literary endeavor. Close analysis and interpretation of texts and fluency in writing will prepare students for success in advanced education or in numerous fields such as publishing, editing, writing, business, Christian ministry, and public relations, as well as many other professional careers.

 
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  1. Students will communicate the biblical text in oral and written forms in an audience appropriate manner.
  2. Students will locate, evaluate, and utilize biblical, theological, and related information in ministry related endeavors.
  3. Students will establish and maintain professional demeanor and relationships within the church and community.
  4. Students will articulate and model the essential spiritual disciplines for personal spiritual growth and the uniqueness of a Christian World View when examined in light of other world views.
  5. Students will evaluate diverse forms of literature.
Course Code
Course Name
Credits
BIB/NWT/OLT/THE
Courses
12 cr
CMS/DIG/MTN
Courses
2 cr
Elective
Elective Course
3 cr
FNA
Fine Arts Appreciation
3 cr
HIS
213 or 223, History Course
3 cr
HIS/LIT/CUL/SOC
Course
3 cr
MTH
Math Course
3 cr
PHE
Physical Education Course
1 cr
SCI
Science Course
3 cr
TOTAL
 
61 credits

For students seeking to pursue graduate education, most graduate programs require a minimum GPA of 3.0 for entrance.

Course Descriptions & Related Information

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BIB 103 Introduction to Biblical Interpretation 3 credits

A practical introduction to the study of the Bible. The course provides an overview of fundamental issues of interpretation, inspiration, manuscripts, and translation. Emphasis is on basic approaches to Bible study and appropriate use of biblical reference tools. Only required for non-ministry majors.

COM 123 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 credits

A basic course in public speaking designed to provide both theory and practice in principles of effective speech composition and communication.

ENG 123 College Writing and Research 3 credits

This course stresses the writing process and introduces the skills necessary to conduct college-level research. Emphasis is placed on argumentative and analytical writing supported by research. A passing grade of C- or higher is required.

HIS 213 Ancient and Medieval World History 3 credits

A survey of world civilization from the beginning of civilization to the Renaissance. Special attention is given to major events, individual, and the cultural contributions of each civilization.

HIS 223 Modern and Contemporary World History 3 credits

A survey of world civilization from the Enlightenment to the present. Special attention is given to major events, individual, and the cultural contributions of each civilization.

HIS 233 U. S. History - Colonization to Reconstruction 3 credits

A survey of the major events and individuals in United States history from Colonization to Reconstruction. Critically examines various topics of interpretive interest in American history such as the coming of the coming of the Europeans, Puritanism, religious freedom, the Revolution, slavery, immigration, industrialization, urbanization, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.

HIS 243 U. S. History - Reconstruction to the Present 3 credits

A survey of the major events and individuals in United States history from just after Reconstruction to the present. Critically examines various topics of interpretive interest in American history such as immigration, industrialization, urbanization, the rise of Big Business, imperialism, the New Deal, the Cold War, Vietnam, the civil rights movement, etc. No prerequisites required.

NWT 113 New Testament Survey 3 credits

A panoramic view of the chief events, prominent characters, main themes and salient teachings of each New Testament book in relation to its historical, geographical and cultural contexts.

OLT 123 Old Testament Survey 3 credits

A study of the historical settings, literary features, authorship, theological teachings, and general content of the books of the Hebrew Bible. This survey provides a factual and practical groundwork for further studies in the Old Testament.

PHE 281Health and Nutrition1 credit

This course is an overview of personal health and stress management strategies for identifying and preventing health problems. Successful exercise, wellness, and nutrition programs are introduced. May be taken one time only. This course is required of all students.

PHL 113 Worldviews 3 credits

This course will examine and apply principles involved in the development of a worldview. The course will emphasize the development and application of a Christian worldview. Special emphasis will be given to critical, creative, and Christian thinking skills.

PSY 223 Introduction to Psychology 3 credits

An introduction to the basic concepts of human behavior, motivation, emotion and personality, and a survey of the contemporary psychological field.

SOC 103 Life Formation 3 credits

A practical study of the classic spiritual disciplines that are essential to lifelong spiritual formation from a Pentecostal perspective. The course will emphasize intentional and holistic applications in daily living.

THE 233 A/G Doctrine and History 3 credits

A study of Assemblies of God antecedents, history, government, doctrinal emphases, distinctives, and missions.

ENG 173 Linguistics 3 credits

This course offers an introduction to linguistics, methods of analysis of language, and the role of language in society. The basic concepts of phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics are also covered. Other areas of inquiry include: how children acquire language; how languages are affected by contact with other languages; and the workings of the brain in the creation and transmission of language. Prerequisite: ENG 123 or ENG 497.

LIT 203 Understanding and Appreciating Poetry 3 credits

This course will focus on the study of poetry as an art form, literary genre, and medium for personal expression. Students will develop skills necessary for reading, analyzing, and understanding poetry while examining the works of renowned poets. Some opportunity will be given for writing poetry.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 243 English Literature 3 credits

A critical and historical study of selected English literature from the fifth century to the present. Representative authors from each period are selected so that students may gain an appreciation for outstanding authors and an understanding of the society in which each lived.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 244 Chaucer and Medieval Lit 3 credits

An examination of the writings of Geoffrey Chaucer, specifically The Canterbury Tales, in the context of history and language of Chaucer’s 14th century England. This course will reference other authors of the period such as Langland, Kempe, and the Pearl Poet.
Prerequisites: LIT 243 and LIT 291.

LIT 253 American Literature I 3 credits

A study of the major writers, works, and movements from the discovery of the New World to the Civil War, with an emphasis on literature that reflects diverse cultures such as Native, African-, Asian-, and Hispanic-American.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 254 American Literature II 3 credits

A study of the major writers, works, and movements from the Civil War to the Postmodern period, with an emphasis on literature that reflects diverse cultures such as Native, African-, Asian-, and Hispanic-American.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 291 Intro to Literary Criticism 3 credits

A study of literary theory and contemporary interpretive practices, including formalist, biographical, psychoanalytic, historical, structuralist, poststructuralist, sociological, Marxist, feminist, reader response, and deconstructionist.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 371 Modern/Postmodern Novel 3 credits

A study of modern and postmodern novels on both sides of the Atlantic, emphasizing the distinctive way in which writers use style, structure, and technical experiment to express their views of the world. The significance of innovative literature techniques such as point of view, impressionism, stream of consciousness, and authorial impersonality will also be explored.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497, and LIT 291.

LIT 381 Major Author Studies 3 credits

Covers the life and selected works of one or more major writers such as Dickens, Hardy, Milton, Twain or Faulkner. Since the author(s) studied varies, this course may be taken more than once.
Prerequisite: LIT 291 and appropriate survey course - LIT 253, 254, or 243.

LIT 433 Shakespeare and His Contemporaries 3 credits

An introduction to Shakespeare and his contemporaries, including Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson. Special emphasis is given to textual study, cultural contexts, and performance strategies of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, and histories.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 495 Senior Seminar 3 credits

An intensive study of a literary topic, this course provides English majors the opportunity to demonstrate advanced research and writing skills. The seminar project includes an oral presentation to other majors and to the faculty of the English department. Students should choose a topic and faculty advisor a semester before enrolling in LIT 495.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497

LIT 303 The Theology of C. S. Lewis 3 credits

This course explores the writing of C. S. Lewis, who insisted his works be judged by their literary merit not only their theology. Themes of pain and suffering, the cultural relevance of Christianity, and biblical reflection in Lewis’s fiction and apologetics will be analyzed.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 347 A Novel Conversion 3 credits

The course grapples with the fundamental questions of human experiences from a religious or spiritual perspective. Some Biblical works will be included; however, the focus will be on how religious ideas and concerns have informed an enormous diversity of literary productions drawn on a variety of traditions (including non-Western and non-monotheistic ones.)
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 353 Biblical Literature and its Contemporary Counterparts 3 credits

Many Bible passages have inspired writers to explore similar issues in modern settings. This course juxtaposes the Bible with modern fiction, comparing and contrasting shared themes. For example, read the book of Job along with the modern play J.B. by Archibald MacLeish.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

OLT 313 Psalms & Wisdom Literature 3 credits

A study of the books of Job through Song of Solomon with special emphasis on Psalms. Methods of studying Hebrew poetry are learned along with the values of each book for theology, worship and everyday life. Prerequisite: OLT 123.

LIT 213 Science Fiction Literature 3 credits

This course will offer students the opportunity to read widely among the various literatures of the Bible and its literary counterparts found in poetry, prose, and fiction. The course will attempt to explore and analyze the relationship between the sacred and the secular by using works from John Milton, C.S. Lewis, T.S. Eliot, George Herbert, William Shakespeare, Emily Dickinson, and several others. Several traditional as well as modern models of literary criticism will be considered.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 273 Children's Literature 3 credits

A survey of children’s literary classics. Students will learn to analyze and evaluate a wide range of children’s literature. In addition, the role of literature in children’s growth and development will be explored.
Prerequisites: ENG 123 or 497, and EDU 103 or PSY 283.

LIT 325 333 Adolescents & Young Adults 3 credits

The course explores quality adolescent and young adult literature, censorship of adolescent and young adult literature, various approaches to reading adolescent and young adult literature, including reader response criticism, close reading strategies, and contemporary critical theories; the imagined reader(s) of young adult texts, and, by extension, the recent history of the cultural construction of the “teenager”; the application of cultural theories to analyses of adolescent and young adult literature as not only literary texts but also parallel cultural artifacts and mass-produced products; issues of multiculturalism, globalism, and diverse audiences and subject matter; and the relation of adolescent literature to “classic” adult literature. Prerequisites: ENG 123 or 497, and EDU 113.

LIT 383 Detective Literature 3 credits

A scholarly evaluation of multicultural detective fiction written by classic and contemporary writers with the goal of illustrating how theology, feminism, multicultural and ethnic issues, and other serious topics can be woven into this genre which is sometimes dismissed as mere entertainment.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 393 The Literature of Women 3 credits

A reading of women writers placed in their historical and literary contexts to explore issues such as the phases of a female literary tradition; the impact of sex and/or gender on literary themes and writing styles; and canon formation.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 255 African-American Literature 3 credits

A study of American life and thought as expressed in African-American literature. Representative authors are studied from the colonial period to the present. The values and variety of life in America are examined through analysis of this culture’s literature.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 363 World Literature Survey I 3 credits

A critical and historical study of masterpieces of world literature from the Ancient World, Middle Ages, and Renaissance.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

LIT 364 World Literature Survey II 3 credits

A critical and historical study of masterpieces of world literature from the Enlightenment through the Postmodern period. The course includes Western and non-Western literature and deals with a variety of literary forms including poetry, drama, short stories, novellas, and non-fiction.
Prerequisite: LIT 363.

LIT 371 Modern/Postmodern Novel3 credits

A study of modern and postmodern novels on both sides of the Atlantic, emphasizing the distinctive way in which writers use style, structure, and technical experiment to express their views of the world. The significance of innovative literature techniques such as point of view, impressionism, stream of consciousness, and authorial impersonality will also be explored. Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

COM 323 Business Communication 3 credits

COM 323 Business Communication 3 credits Emphasis on methods needed for effective communication in the business environment. Includes interpersonal communication, oral and written reports, business letters and memos, proposal writing, and case study presentations. Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497 and COM 123 or 494.

ENG 223 Creative Writing 3 credits

Structured as a writing workshop, this course encourages students to develop a personal writing style and voice through the writing of literary essays and through experimentation with writing short stories, drama, and poetry. Skill in revising and marketing are taught.
Prerequisite: ENG 123 or 497.

ENG 333 Writing for the Media 3 credits

This course will introduce students to various types of mass media writing -- print and broadcast journalism, public relations, advertising and online media. It will develop skills in information gathering, interviewing, organizing, writing and revising media writing and in judging the quality of current media writing. Students will learn how to create a weblog or online “blog” and become an expert in a niche field. The class will teach students to look at a news story and determine the best media to represent it. Prerequisites: ENG 123 or 497.